Tag Archives: Comic Con

Weekly Painting Week 66- Because you can’t take yourself too seriously Spiderman as a youth

Sometimes art is heavy, filled with angst.

(Sidebar, remember that great Sparks song, Angst in My Pants? here’s a link:

So, you have to lighten things up and have fun doing this- here is this week’s post, Spidey as a kid. 12 x 24, acrylic on canvas. A great way to make the red pop out, mix some green in the grey background. spidey2

Weekly Painting Week 56 Le Hulk Incroyable!

hulk

What did the Hulk look like as a kid? ….now we know. Acrylic on canvas, 12 x 12″ Short, sweet, and a fun thing to paint.

<a href=”http://fineartamerica.com/art/all/corvette/all&#8221; style=”font: 10pt arial; text-decoration: underline;”>corvette art</a>

Weekly Painting Week 54 Mr. Sinister and Apocalypse painting two figures in a composition

Sinister

Painting on a larger canvas has its advantages- one is not having to use a magnifying glass to paint nostrils or pupils or the little things in ears. An advantage of painting a small work is that a little color makes a big impact. I used the red to set off all that blue on the figures and in the background. The red is the amazing Gamblin Cadmium Red Light- one of the colors I no longer can do without. Mr. Sinister and Apocalypse, 11 x 14 oil on canvas.

Weekly Painting Week 53 Only Doom dares to dream! Dr. Doom solo. Multitasking

doom

This weeks painting features Victor von Doom, aka Dr. Doom. Not the finance guy, the original. Few people can pull of referring to themselves in the third person and not sound silly, but Victor is one of them. One of my favorite Dr. Doom quotes:

“From our previous encounter, lackey, I owe you vengeance.” He’s awesome that way.

I had Dr. Doom in this painting in a classic pose, with a grayed background. It looked like he was standing underground, or against a warehouse wall. It came to me in a flash that
1. He is in Latveria
2. It’s freezing there
3. Doom probably withstands cold and wind ok.

So here he is in a snowstorm, I completed this with another painting and had to remind myself not to glaze it at the same time. You can keep notes as you create art in a neat notebook or you can leave yourself glaring reminders of where you are in your process. Here is my reminder not to varnish the painting early, sounds like Victor said it:

no glaze

Weekly Painting Week 49- What color is the sky in your world? African Sunrise Painting

lion king2

 

Why is the sky blue? I had that question as a kid and only my Mom could give me an intelligent answer, something like this:

The blue color of the sky is due to Rayleigh scattering. As light moves through the atmosphere, most of the longer wavelengths pass straight through. Little of the red, orange and yellow light is affected by the air.

However, much of the shorter wavelength light is absorbed by the gas molecules. The absorbed blue light is then radiated in different directions. It gets scattered all around the sky. Whichever direction you look, some of this scattered blue light reaches you. Since you see the blue light from everywhere overhead, the sky looks blue.

As an artist, you must know that as you look closer to the horizon, the sky appears much paler in color. To reach you, the scattered blue light must pass through more air. Some of it gets scattered away again in other directions. Less blue light reaches your eyes. The color of the sky near the horizon appears paler or white.

Got it? Now when the next kid asks, you are ready!

I have painted the sky about every color there is, here is a sky with no blue at all. I used Azo red, Vermilion, Cadmium Red, Cadmium Red Light ( a very different color than cad red) and cadmium yellow. Then, thin streaks of white and various colors blended in for some variance. Use water or glazing medium to do this. Acrylic dries in the time it takes to run and get a drink, so the silhouetted figures can be painted on quickly. Painted for a good friend of ours, part two of this diptych next week.

Paints this week were from Lukas, who sells the paint in a squeeze bottle– excellent pigment and so inexpensive!! Also used Liquitex, great pigments as well.

lukas-cryl-terzia-acrylics-500ml-bottles

 

Weekly Painting Week 48 Silver Surfer in Monochrome Oil Painting

This monochrome painting came out a little too “mono”. The pthalo blue and white worked for about everything, but a little more contrast did the trick- pthalo turquoise behind the figure made it stand out. Other than that, blue is a great color for a monochromatic work. You can tint (add white) or tone (add black) to make several values of color. Good idea to start with a value scale, mix the colors and go from there. Silver Surfer, 11 x 14″ oil on canvas. silversurferfinal

 

<a href=”http://fineartamerica.com/art/all/beach+art/all&#8221; style=”font: 10pt arial; text-decoration: underline;”>beach art art</a>

Weekly painting week 47: Skully Skully Night Apocolypse and Mystique Dyptich

Painting two or more paintings together? Just line them up and sketch/paint together to make sure the backgrounds match. Even if they are not displayed together this will visually connect the works. Two more comic works in oil, these are smaller, 11 x 14 each. My version of Mystique and Apocalypse from two different covers. Yellow ochre in the background sets off the Pthalo blue on Mystique and the Manganese blue on Apocalypse. Love the Gamblin Fastmatte paint!!Dries in about a day and you can mix with regular oils. 11 x 14″ each, oil on canvas.

mys1apoc2

comic art art

Weekly Painting Week 46- Start a painting, finish a painting, sell a painting. Plein Air Competition

This was a Quick Draw competition, in which the artists had to start with a blank canvas at 10 a.m. and finish when the horn sounded at 12 noon. That is 120 minutes to sketch, underpaint and finish off a painting. The time goes FAST and I am a fast painter to begin with! The finished paintings looked vibrant and exciting with a couple of dings, scratches and mistakes that only made them more interesting. Selecting a view was the hard part- had to be complex enough to be interesting, but not so complicated that I could not finish it. I selected a row of houses for the color, perspective and the very prominent American Flag.

A couple of notes:

– I had 120 minutes and used at least 30 on the charcoal sketch. This made a much better painting than I could have done otherwise. So begin with the end in mind- the drawing is the bones of the painting and we all want to have good bones!

– Use true, not local color. I used Gamblin’s Portland Greys for the sky as it was very overcast, I saw more than one finished painting with a bright blue sky- not a criticism, but a different choice than I made. There were very few sharp shadows which made for a more serene mood.

– I left out some details because there just wasn’t enough time to get them all in. You know you are looking at the American Flag whether or not there are detailed stars on it.

– You may want to pack a ruler!! Even in nature you may need to make a straight line here or there.

– Take some breaks and step back about 10 feet and take a good look. The parts that need work will jump out at you

– Prepare to do a lot of talking. Or listening. Many people will want to discuss what you are doing and that is part of the experience.

– Some fantastic colors for landscapes: chrome oxide green (instead of pthalo), cadmium red light, ultramarine (has replaced cerulean in most of my outside stuff), Portland Grey Light, Portland Grey Medium, Dioxy Purple (don’t make yourself crazy trying to mix red and blue!) and Windsor Lemon. The bricks are a grayed down Alizarin with a little white- a mixing accident that nailed the color!

– The whole Quick Draw experience was a lot like running a 10K- you may not be the best person out there, but you will get to finish and have your moment of triumph, large or small. Pause and appreciate this!

– Have a price in your head in case someone wants to buy your masterpiece and you want to sell it- this painting went home with an art lover, which was fine with me.

Finished Painting:
finished painting1

Lined up easels at the finish line:

street view

Reference photo:
yellow house2

Weekly Painting Week 41- 3 Completed Paintings

It’s late Friday afternoon, big 3 day weekend ahead, and I left nothing on the table! I mean the easel. Here are the three paintings I have been working on, and think they are finally ready to escape from the studio. The Batman, well, really happy with this one. The island painting saw a surfer get painted in, then painted back out. Let me know what you think- should there be a person in this scene? Last, the abstract wave on paper. I have heeded the advice “don’t fear the bold highlight”. Especially in acrylic, that will make things happen for you. Tip of the week, if you are going to have refreshments in your art area, make sure your paint thinner isn’t near and /or in the same size cup as your iced tea. See photo and don’t drink your paint water by accident. cups

batman croc

island

green wave

Weekly Painting Week 39- More Comic Art and paintings in progress. May the Fourth Be With You

Hope you got your free comics on Saturday! So much excitement, then May 4th, today the Spiderman movie. So…at a recent comic con I met Ethan Van Sciver, gifted comic artist. Green Lantern Rebirth has art that took my breath away. I handed Ethan my hardback copy and asked if he would sign it— here is a picture of what he did, now in a very treasured place in my collection!! hal jordan

Here are three paintings that I have in the works now. Working in oils on the Batman cover means I can only work on this about one day out of seven. Not letting the layers dry can mean bad cracks a few years down the line. Meanwhile here are two others I started. More as I develop them next week.

croc coverwave1beach1

I sold a painting to a surfer today! how cool is that! this one:
wave

<a href=”http://fineartamerica.com/art/all/surf+art/all&#8221; style=”font: 10pt arial; text-decoration: underline;”>surf art art</a>